Liz Rywelski

About

Liz Rywelski keeps a studio at Space1026 Gallery, in Philadelphia, PA. USA. She has been there since October, 2002, after she held internships with 1026's printmaker Ben Woodward, political artist Jesse Goldstein, and sculptor/painter Max Lawrence. So far, she has curated four shows at SPACE1026 Gallery; Baby Girl, Put It On Me, a tattoo show 6/03; New Money a solo exhibition by Josh O.S. 2/04; Paradise photographs by Lily Frisco 8/04; and Corpororacist, an installation by Albo Jeavons 10/04.

Upcoming shows are an installation by Cory Arcangel and BEIGE 11/05, a collection of assignments from the project, Learning To Love You More, by Harrell Fletcher and Miranda July 9/05, and a new body of work by Steven and Billy Dufala 3/06.

Liz lives for domestic bliss and love. She believes that art experienced in the outside world is more powerful than art in galleries; it must first take place in the heart, in relationships, and in eye contact with passing strangers. She believes in community, beauty, her cat and she really wants to know what it feels like to be you.


Exhibitions

2004

Everybody Rules Everything
curated by Thom Lessner
Antisocial gallery
Vancouver, BC

Philadelphia Selections 5
curated by Brian Wallace
Goldie Paley Gallery
Philadelphia, PA

Beaver College group show with Space1026, PaperRad, and The Royal Art Lodge
in conjunction with Beautiful Losers, Cincinnati OH
The Mockbee Gallery, Ohio

Paper Awesome!
A drawing show
Mimi Barr Gallery
San Francisco, CA

Works on Paper 2004
curated by Jordan Kantor, MOMA
Arcadia University, PA

The New Acropolis
An invitational exhibition of young Philadelphia artists
The Fleisher-Ollman Gallery
Philadelphia, PA

Man, I Feel Like a Woman
curated by Courtney Dailey
Space1026
Philadelphia, PA

2002

the Pornography of Emotion
a so-low drawing exhibition
curated by Crystal Kovaks
Repo Records
Philadelphia PA

the bad touch
A Drawing Show
Curated by Lump Lipschitz
A traveling exhibition
Keith Talent Gallery, London, UK
The Rose Museum, Boston MA
LUMP Gallery, NC
The Ukrainian Museum, Chicago IL

And more

Text Messages
Since August of 2003, I have been approaching strangers on the street, coffee shops, in bars and at social gatherings, collecting cell phone numbers from others personal cell phone books. “Please do not give me any names, just numbers”, I ask. These numbers without names are saved to my cell phone. I compose short text messages and send them out to the numbers I have collected. The recipient is anywhere, sometimes they write back. I have recorded and not replied to every reply. Examples of some messages are below:

I AM THE
HAPPIEST
PERSON
IN THE
WORLD
BECAUSE
I KNOW
YOU
10-7-03
4PM


YOU LOOK LIKE
PARIS, FRANCE
EVERYDAY
10-15-03
8AM


IT IS TRUE,
EVERYONE IS
EITHER A
FARMER OR
A PIRATE.
11-18-03 1AM


A ROCK
1.75 BILLION
YEARS OLD
REMAINS
IN THE SAME
PLACE.
12-14-03
7PM


Studio Drawings

The Giveaway
The Giveaway
a colaboration between Josh O.S, and Liz Rywelski Shopping is a defining characteristic of modern culture; it is a way for people to express themselves as individuals and define distinctions from peers, and members of other classes. The Giveaway is an ongoing project whose aim is to draw attention to the role of shopping in our society, the social and economic machinery which lie behind it, and subcultures cultivated by it. Just as automobile companies continually release new models and constantly update their product lines, The Giveaway will also release a range of products in a series of successive campaigns. These products will not be for sale. They will be left in public as a gratuitous gesture. Beautiful luxury products that you cannot buy, which do not form a direct part of any corporate marketing campaign, are offered for the taking. More importantly, these objects, and abstractions of principles in advertising, form the basis of campaigns, which advertise our ideals. The first of these campaigns, is for the statement, "You Can Have Something Nice Too." Instead of using the tools of advertising, (print ads, commercials, slogans, etc.) to sell products, we are using objects and products to sell ideas and statements. Turning these hollow objects, which symbolize waste, dressing them up as new products of desire, to give away in a gratuitous gesture. The first suite in our series, The Giveaway, was installed on the sidewalks of Center City Philadelphia in September 2002. The installation was photo and video documented. Six carts were installed, some were taken away after 1-2 days, the longest lasted 2 weeks on 16th and Walnut Street. We are currently preparing our next installation for spring 2004 for select parts of Manhattan.

Hearts

The Red Room

K-mart
K-Mart
They may look like the Olan Mills photographs that hang in homes across America., but these portraits of 24 year-old Elizabeth Rywelski represent a new kind of performance art. Ever since she graduated from Philadelphia's Moore College of Art and Design two years ago, Rywelski has been going to Kmart stores, having the chains employees project their style onto her, then committing those images to film at the in-house Olan Mills portrait studios. The shtick is a tad complex: Rywelski enters Kmart wearing zero makeup. Jeans, and a solid top. Enlisting the help of a (usually female) employee she invents a scenario for having her picture taken (it's for her parents, say, or a fictional husband) and explains that she has just $100, in the form of a Kmart gift card, to buy a special outfit to wear in the photo. Then she asks the sales associate to choose her clothing, accessories, and even makeup. Once the pictures are shot, Rywelski returns the gear and restores the card to it's original balance. The stunt was inspired in part by her own grade-school photos, which she regards "more portraits of my parents, because they had chosen my haircut and my clothes." It was also driven by her interest in artist Cindy Sherman, famous for photographing herself in iconic roles. So far, Rywelski has done 11 shots and shown the work in galleries. Some viewers have accused her of taking advantage of the Kmart staff, but Rywelski sees the women as collaborators; "I could have never these images together in the same way without their help." Still, she admits, "I went through a period of questioning whether I was getting at something or just messing with people." Seems to us great artists do both.

-Lynne Palazzi; Budget Living Magazine August/September 2004


Bibliography

Complex Magazine
Nike Trading Card Illustration
October 2003

Work Magazine
Issue One, March 2004
"YOU ARE IN OR YOU ARE OUT"
Issue Five, June 2004
"TURN UP THE HEAT"
www.workmag.net

Maybe Magazine
Issue #4
April 2004
www.maybemagazine.com

The Philadelphia Independent
"The SEPTA Letters"
Issue 14-21

ROCKPILE Magazine
Issue #102

Budget Living Magazine
August/September 2004